Legislative and Regulatory Update | Legal and Regulatory Compliance

Proposed Regulatory Relief Saves $1.1 Billion for Providers

Legislative and Regulatory Update | Legal and Regulatory Compliance

Proposed Regulatory Relief Saves $1.1 Billion for Providers

A proposal to eliminate required outpatient medical histories and physicals could reduce costs for healthcare providers by $454 annually.

The Trump administration has proposed $1.1 billion in savings for the healthcare industry through annual regulatory relief. The largest amount of regulatory savings in the proposed rule is an estimated $454 million annual savings that would result from removing the requirement that every Medicare patient treated at a hospital outpatient department or ambulatory surgery center complete a medical history and physical.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services projects this initiative will result in almost $5.2 billion in savings for healthcare providers between 2018 and 2021.

Read an extended article on this proposed rule, “$1.1 Billion in Provider Regulatory Relief Proposed,” in HFMA’s Healthcare Business News (hfma.org /news/regulatoryrelief)

Proposed Savings from the Patients Over Paperwork Initiative


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